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Ethnic hatred

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Title: Ethnic hatred  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ethnic conflict, Discrimination, Racial Equality Proposal, Xenophobia, Internet censorship and surveillance by country
Collection: Anti-National Sentiment, Discrimination, Ethnic Conflict, Racism
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Ethnic hatred

Ethnic hatred, inter-ethnic hatred, racial hatred, or ethnic tension refers to feelings and acts of prejudice and hostility towards an ethnic group in various degrees. See list of anti-ethnic and anti-national terms for specific cases.

There are multiple origins for ethnic hatred and the resulting ethnic conflicts. In some societies it is rooted in tribalism, while in others it originates from a history of non-peaceful co-existence and the resulting actual disputed issues.

Often ethnic conflict is enhanced by nationalism and feeling of national superiority. For which reason inter-ethnic hatred borders with racism, and often the two terms are conflated.

On the opposite side, ethnic conflict may stem from the feeling of real or perceived discrimination by another ethnic group, see "reverse racism".

Ethnic hatred has often been exploited and even fueled by some political leaders to serve their agenda of seeking to consolidate the nation or gain electorate by calling for a united struggle against a common enemy (real or imaginary).[1]

In many countries incitement to ethnic or racial hatred is a criminal offense.

See also

References

  1. ^ Using Ethnic Hatred to Meet Political Ends (about ethnic problems in Indian subcontinent)
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